Upcoming Events

Spring 2018
 
Cosponsored with the Department of German and Russian, the International Relations Program, the Department of Media Studies, and the Oldenborg Luncheon Colloquium at Pomona College

Monsters To Destroy

Ben Tumin
Independent Filmaker and Comedian
Pomona College, Class of 2012

Friday, March 2, Noon
Oldenborg Dining Hall, south side,  Pomona College

“Monsters to Destroy” is a multimedia performance by filmmaker and comedian Ben Tumin that discusses refugee resettlement in the United States. Mixing information about the refugee crisis with clips from interviews conducted with Scott Cooper, a retired marine working in human rights advocacy, and five young Syrians living in Germany, Ben takes a different look at the impact of refugee resettlement, particularly from the perspective of national security. Through anecdotes about his grandfather — himself once a refugee — Ben weaves in his connection to the cause and pieces together what he has learned about himself, his country, and the questions that remain.

Ben Tumin, Pomona ’12, is a filmmaker and comedian born, raised, and based in New York. He worked at Amnesty International in Morocco and the community building platform Meetup before forging an independent career in political comedy and filmmaking. His work has been featured in The Daily Beast, Al Jazeera, and The Brian Lehrer Show (WNYC). Ben holds a B.A. in History from Pomona College.

Dining hall access does require a meal purchase: 5C students swipe in and 7C faculty/staff sign in; community members may attend at Oldenborg’s discretion and incur a charge.


Paring Populism
France under Emmanuel Macron

Jonah Levy
Associate Professor of Political Science
University of California Berkeley

Thursday, March 8, 12:15-1:15
Hampton Room, second floor Malott Commons, Scripps College

France has suffered decades of slow growth and mass unemployment, accompanied by the seemingly inexorable rise of populist forces, most notably the radical right, xenophobic National Front of Marine Le Pen.  Yet in May 2017, Emmanuel Macron put a halt to the rise of French populism.  Macron swept to the presidency and trounced Le Pen by embracing economic reform, European integration, and an openness to international forces, ideas, and persons.  My presentation takes stock of the changes introduced by Macron in governance and policy.  Can Macron revive France’s economy and international status?  Can he restore voter faith in French democracy?  The case of France is interesting in its own right, but also as a test of the capacity of democratic elites to combat populism by championing liberal values of openness and tolerance and delivering structural reform and economic prosperity.

Jonah Levy received his Ph.D. in political science from MIT in 1994. He teaches courses in comparative political economy, French and West European politics, and the welfare state. Levy is Vice Chair of UC Berkeley’s Department of Political Science, as well as Director of Undergraduate Studies. He is currently conducting research on France’s response to the 2008 crisis as well as on the relationship between partisanship and economic liberalization in contemporary Western Europe. Levy has been a member of the executive committee of the Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Research Program at Berkeley, and he serves on the international advisory board of the journal French Politics. He received a Phi Beta Kappa award for excellence in teaching and was selected as the UC Berkeley, Undergraduate Political Science Association Professor of the Year. Levy’s books include: Vice into Virtue: A Progressive Path of Economic Liberalization (forthcoming); The Oxford Handbook of the Transformations of the State (co-editor) (Oxford University Press, 2015); The Process of Political Representation in the Global Age (co-editor) (Cambridge University Press, 2014); and The State after Statism: New State Activities in the Age of Liberalization (editor) (Harvard University Press, 2006), among others.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. Please feel free to bring your own lunch. If you wish to purchase a lunch, the Malott Commons Dining Hall opens at 11:15 A.M. Doors open to the Hampton Room at Noon.


Human Rights in the Era of Trump

Margaret Huang
Executive Director, Amnesty International USA

Wednesday, March 21, 6:00 pm
Balch Auditorium, Scripps College

Presented in Partnership with the Humanities Institute

Ms. Huang will discuss refugee and migrant rights, the rights of human rights defenders, immigration and the rise of nationalist rhetoric, and offer a comparison of immigration issues in Europe and the United States.

Margaret Huang, an advocate for human rights and racial justice for more than two decades, is the Executive Director of Amnesty International USA. As the chief executive officer, Ms. Huang is responsible for advancing the vision and mission of the organization, managing the organization’s day-to-day operations and activities, serving as the lead spokesperson for the organization, and ensuring the organization’s financial health. She has worked with Members of Congress on critical pieces of legislation, and she has advocated before the United Nations human rights mechanisms as well as the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. She has published articles and opinion pieces on human rights, and she authored a chapter, “Going Global – Appeals to International and Regional Human Rights Bodies,” in Human Rights At Home, published by Praeger Publishers in December 2007. Ms. Huang’s opinion pieces have been published in Time, The Washington Post, Newsweek, U.S. News and World Report, Rolling Stone, the Miami Herald, and numerous other leading outlets, and she has been interviewed on National Public Radio, CNN, NBC News, Al Jazeera, and other global and domestic media. She regularly speaks on human rights issues to national and international associations, universities, and conferences.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis.

 


Dealing with the Past 2.0
Youth, Performance Art and Memory Politics in Croatia and Beyond

Arnaud Kurze
Global Fellow, Woodrow Wilson Center
Associate Professor of Justice Studies,
Montclair State University

Wednesday, March 28, 12:15 pm
Hampton Room, 2nd Floor, Malott Commons, Scripps College

In his talk, Dr. Kurze explores the creation of alternative transitional justice spaces in post­-conflict contexts, particularly concentrating on the role of art and the impact of social movements to address human rights abuses. Drawing from the fieldwork in Croatia and the post-conflict Balkans, he scrutinizes the work of contemporary youth activists and artists to deal with the past and foster sociopolitical change. He explains why the emergence of transitional justice youth activism falls short of the significant institutional reforms of earlier youth movement mobilizations in the region. He also throws light on why their performance activism is distinct from practices of older, established human rights organizations in the region. Notwithstanding, he argues that this performance-based advocacy work has fuelled the creation of a new spatiality of deliberation – so-called strategic confrontation spaces – to contest the culture of impunity and challenge the politics of memory in the former Yugoslavia.

Arnaud Kurze is Assistant Professor of Justice Studies at Montclair State University. His scholarly work on transitional justice in the post-Arab Spring world focuses particularly on youth activism, art and collective memory. Dr. Kurze was appointed a Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, DC, from 2016-2018, studying youth resilience in North Africa and the Middle East. During 2012-2013 he was a Visiting Scholar at the Center for Global Studies (CGS) at George Mason University. In the past, he was the Publication & Web Editor at CGS and Coordinator of CGS’s “Human Rights, Justice & Democracy Project,” funded by the Open Society Institute. Since 2013 he has been a Visiting Scholar at New York University. He has published in several academic journals, contributed to edited volumes and is author of several reports on foreign affairs for government and international organizations. He regularly writes analyses and op-ed articles online for think tanks and other institutions.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. Please feel free to bring your own lunch. If you wish to purchase a lunch, the Malott Commons Dining Hall opens at 11:15 A.M. Doors open to the Hampton Room at Noon.

 


Past Events Spring 2018:

Cosponsored with Oldenborg Luncheon Colloquium at Pomona College

The Impressive Growth of the Czech Economy
(A Look Behind the Curtain)

Helena Fialová
Associate Professor of Economics
Czech Technical University, Metropolitan University, and University of New York, Prague

Tuesday, January 30, 12:15 pm
Oldenborg Dining Hall, South Side, Pomona College

After several years of weak economic performance, the global economy showed improvement in 2017. GDP and trade growth rates have accelerated, including for the economies of the Czech Republic’s main trading partners. The Czech economy is in an exceptionally good state. The estimated numbers for 2017 read as follows: real GDP growth at 4.1%, gross fixed capital formation at 6.2%, an average inflation rate of 2.4%, an unemployment rate of 3% at the same time that employment is increasing at a rate of 1.4%, increasing wages at 7.4% and, finally, a positive current account balance and an incredible government budget surplus after 20 years of deficits. Is it all too good to be true? Politicians look at these numbers and speak of paradise. Economists are not so optimistic. In the short run, they see clear signs of overheating; in the long run, they see barriers to continued economic growth.

Dining hall access does require a meal purchase: 5C students swipe in and 7C faculty/staff sign in; community members may attend at Oldenborg’s discretion and incur a charge.


Cosponsored with the Scripps College Department of Classics

Fake Olds
History & Alternative Facts in Classical Athens

Dr. Johanna Hanink
Associate Professor of Classics, Brown University

Thursday, February 15, 12:15 pm
Hampton Room, 2nd Floor, Malott Commons, Scripps College

The current presidential administration has a reputation for making mistakes about history, but the classical Athenians fudged history, too, in the pursuit of ‘nationalist’ rhetorical aims. This talk will explore a few case studies in how the classical Athenians deployed their own ‘alternative facts.’

Johanna Hanink earned her PhD in Classics from the University of Cambridge (Queens’ College) in 2010/2011. She works primarily on theater and performance, literary biography, the cultural life and afterlife of classical Athens, and the historical notion of an ancient “Greek miracle.”The Classical Debt: Greek Antiquity in an Era of Austerity (Harvard University Press 2017) is her latest book; it explores how Western fantasies of classical antiquity have created a particularly fraught relationship between the European West and the country of Greece, especially in the context of Greece’s recent “tale of two crises.” She is also author of Lycurgan Athens and the Making of Classical Tragedy (Cambridge University Press 2014) and co-editor, with Richard Fletcher, of the volume Creative Lives in Classical Antiquity: Poets, Artists, and Biography (Cambridge University Press 2016). She is active in Brown’s Program in Modern Greek Studies and is on the board of the Modern Greek Studies Association. She is also on the editorial boards of The Journal of Modern Greek Studies and Eidolon.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. Please feel free to bring your own lunch. If you wish to purchase a lunch, the Malott Commons Dining Hall opens at 11:15 A.M. Doors open to the Hampton Room at Noon.